I have no idea what I am doing, and you can too!

Lub.

Lub.

                                               
Guys, the white sox catcher’s name is Flowers! I like flowers! (at U S Cellular Field)

Guys, the white sox catcher’s name is Flowers! I like flowers! (at U S Cellular Field)

                                               

Never Touch Anything that Looks Like Donald Trump's Hair | WIRED

Ugh - I’m in love! From a distance!

                                               

What an honor!

(via hyggehaven)

Source: best-of-memes

                                               

kihaku-gato:

hyggehaven:

suburbanhearth:

suburbanhearth:

This was yesterday in Calgary AB. My growing season is done. I pulled the garden the night before. We’re expecting more snow today.

Yup Snow this early, and we’re getting more today. 

It’s times like these I don’t miss Alberta.

Awwwww crap now I’m getting really paranoid about my unsupervised tender plants that are outside at the farm.

I mean.

Already?

:-(

Source: suburbanhearth

                                               

peaceful-moon:

jasonviola:

Fear of Flowers Part 1

goodness this is beautiful

(via kihaku-gato)

Source: jasonviola

                                               

biodiverseed:

urban-sustainable:

Information Sourced from Healthy Bees Healthy Lives

#bees #pollinators #infographics

Whatever it takes!

Source: urban-sustainable

                                               
libutron:

Cuphea oreophila
Sometimes known as Orange Bat-Faced Cuphea, Orange Flame, and Cigar Plant, the flowers of Cuphea oreophila (Myrtales - Lythraceae) have corollas of irregularly sized petals (two tall and four or more short) that give the opening of this Cuphea’s bright red-orange flowers a bat-like look.
Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds love the abundant, nectar-rich, cylindrical blossoms that flower nearly year round in areas with mild climates. 
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©James Gaither | Locality: cultivated - San Francisco, California, US (2011)

Orange Bat-Face is my maiden name.

libutron:

Cuphea oreophila

Sometimes known as Orange Bat-Faced Cuphea, Orange Flame, and Cigar Plant, the flowers of Cuphea oreophila (Myrtales - Lythraceae) have corollas of irregularly sized petals (two tall and four or more short) that give the opening of this Cuphea’s bright red-orange flowers a bat-like look.

Butterflies, honeybees and hummingbirds love the abundant, nectar-rich, cylindrical blossoms that flower nearly year round in areas with mild climates. 

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©James Gaither | Locality: cultivated - San Francisco, California, US (2011)

Orange Bat-Face is my maiden name.

(via indefenseofplants)

Source: libutron

                                               

biodiverseed:

An ode to nasturtiums

Every part of this flower that grows above the ground is edible, and tastes like a sharp cress. The young flower buds can be pickled and used as capers, the flowers themselves make a colourful addition to salads, and the green seeds can be used to add a mustard-y punch to any dish. The leaves can also be eaten, and taste similar to arugula or mizuna.

Nasturtiums can be compact, enormous, rambling, or variegated, depending on the cultivar. Their blossoms are most often orange, red, and yellow, but come in an array of other possible colours.

This year I grew “Ladybird,” “Variegated Alaska" and a "High-Climbing" variety. Lovers of cooler weather, nasturtiums can be planted in the early Spring: they self-seed prolifically during the warmest months of Summer, and sprout again on their own in the cool weather of Autumn.

While too tender to survive the winter here, nasturtiums can be invasive in warmer climes. Check to see if nasturtiums are disruptive to your biome before growing them.

Related: Integrating Flowers into your Vegetable Garden

#edible flowers  #edible landscaping #brassicas

So spice!

Source: biodiverseed

                                               

realmonstrosities:

The Pelican Flower is a Central American vine with huge flowers that bloom for just two days before they wilt and die.

The first day is spent using the stench of death and decay to attract flies which get trapped overnight within the depths of the flower. They’re only let out the next day, after a dowsing of pollen, so they can get trapped by a whole new flower and pollinate it in the process.

Pelican Flowers get their name from looking a bit like a pelican from the side. I guess Malevolent Alien Chrysalis Flower didn’t catch on.

…Images: dl7tny/Cary Bass/Kew on Flickr/Brian Chiu/Brian Henderson

Does have a nice ring to it…

(via plant-a-day)

Source: realmonstrosities